Liberty Hall, Machiasport Maine

A Little Bit Of History in DownEast Maine

The tiny town of Machiasport is home to about 1000 residents.  I don’t think there currently are any stores in the town – that’s how small it is.  Machiasport is comprised by several villages including Starboard, Larrabee, Bucks Harbor and the actual village of Machiasport.  As you travel down Route 92 through the pine trees, you will go around the bend where the road meets the ocean and there you are… in the village.  Currently, the village is home to the Machiasport Historical Society and beautiful Liberty Hall which is being lovingly restored.

According to Wikipedia:

Liberty Hall is set on the west side of Port Road (Maine Route 92) in the dispersed village center of Machiasport. It stands on a rise, facing east toward the Machias River. It is a two-story wood frame structure, with a front-facing gable roof, clapboard siding, and a stone foundation. The roof is topped at the front by a small tower, which has an elaborately-decorated open belvidere (viewing platform) with round-arch openings and quoined corner supports, topped by a mansard roof and weathervane. The roof is a replica of the building’s original, which was at one time replaced by a shallow-pitch pyramidal roof. The main facade is symmetrical, with a center double-door entrance topped by a lintel with bracketed molding. Flanking the entrance are doubled sash windows, taller versions of which rise on the second floor. The central second floor windows have round-arch tops. Similar windows adorn the sides, all capped with stylistically similar lintels. The building corners are quoined at the first level, and pilastered at the second. The interior is arranged with a vestibule area in the front, a meeting space on the first floor, and a performance auditorium with stage on the second floor.

Construction of the hall was authorized by the town meeting in 1873, and the building was completed the following year by Andrew Gilson, a Machias contractor and politician. The hall was used not just for town meetings, but also served as a venue for community events, meetings of community organizations such as the Grange, and as a performance venue for traveling shows.[2] The town closed the building in 2000 due to structural conditions, and renovation efforts are currently underway by the Friends of Liberty Hall. The exterior has been restored (included the restoration of the tower’s original appearance), and funds are being raised to restore the interior

image_pdfimage_print
Please follow and like us:
0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial